KeyMusician Keyboard (KMK) Songbook

The table below has links to the PDF files of the music (first column), as well as to the audio files and MIDI files of the music.

Think of this web-page as the “First Division Band Method” book for the KeyMusician Keyboard.

The pieces here are specifically arranged for the KeyMusician Keyboard, and are all within the capabilities of a beginner willing to practice them (it takes practice to develop 'reflex-memory' in your fingers).

If you learn all (or most) of these pieces, you should be able to play much of the music you wish to play, from whatever source.

You can learn to play these pieces from either the printed music, or from the MIDI files.

Select a row of the table for a piece of music you want to learn. You can hear what the piece sounds like by clicking on the “Audio” link in the second column of the selected piece's row.

If you can't play them that way on-line, simply download the audio file (by right-clicking on it, and choosing “save link as” (or something like that)). Then you can browse to where you saved it, and play it by double-clicking on it.

If you want to learn to play it from the music, click on the link in the row's first column, which should open it in your system's PDF viewer. In your PDF viewer, you can print a copy of the music on your printer, and you can play from the printed music.

If you are using Windows, and you don't have a PDF-file viewer on your system, you can get it at the following link:

http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2.html

If you want to learn to play it from the MIDI file, right-click on the “MIDI” link (in the piece's second column), then choose “Save Link As” (or the equivalent in a browser other than Firefox), and it will download the MIDI file for the piece to your machine.

Save the MIDI file to a folder on your machine where you can remember where you saved it (“KMK-Songbook” might be a good folder-name for it). You could also copy (or move) the file from your Downloads folder to such a folder.

Then play the MIDI file using the Integrated Player/Recorder, as described in the tutorial on learning to play music from MIDI files.

The pieces are probably easier to play using modal chords, but standard chords will always work.

The lyrics of the pieces are the melody keys you type (in QWERTY, and sometimes also Dvorak) to play the piece if you're not yet good at reading music. The melody keys assume you use one of the “Z” keyboard layouts supplied. If you use the “Z1” or “Z2” layouts, the keys will not be correct at the right end of the row above the home row, and on the top row.

The last column indicates the relative difficulty of playing the piece, where “1” is easy, and “5” is difficult (a recital-level piece). But even the difficult pieces are something you can play once you have played the easier pieces. If a difficult piece is something you really like, work on it anyway, since liking a piece will motivate you to spend the time you need practicing to play it well.

If you have difficulty getting the timing (rhythm) right, try playing along with the audio (or MIDI) file. You could play the audio file with an iPod-type device, so you don't have to juggle windows on your computer screen.

The pieces in the table are sorted in alphabetical order, using the name in the first column.

Title – Sheet Music

Files

Composer

Arranger

Comments

Difficulty

Amazing Grace

Audio

MIDI


Aere Greenway

Bagpipe arrangement of this traditional piece.

2

Brahms - Intermezzo - Lullaby

Audio

MIDI

Johannes Brahms

Aere Greenway

Theme from Brahms’ piano Intermezzo, Opus 117 No. 1, arranged for Cello.

4

Brahms - Symphony #1, 4th Movement

Audio

MIDI

Johannes Brahms

Aere Greenway

Theme from the 4th movement of Brahms' 1st Symphony.

2

Bugle-Call: Taps

Audio

MIDI


Aere Greenway

Arrangement of the bugle-call “Taps”, indicating sleep-time, also heard at military funerals.

1

Christmas Song

Audio

MIDI


Aere Greenway

O Come Immanuel

2

Classical Gasp

Audio

MIDI

Mozart, Satie, Ravel, Beethoven, Brahms, and Puccini

Aere Greenway

A medley of themes from classical music, by Mozart, Satie, Ravel, Beethoven, Brahms, and Puccini

5

Eine Kleine Nacht Musik

Audio

MIDI

W. A. Mozart

Aere Greenway

A popular piece of Mozart's. Sounds good with the Cello sound on the FluidR3_GM soundfont.

2

Greensleeves

Audio

MIDI


Aere Greenway

Traditional Enlish folk-song

2

Improv for the KeyMusician Keyboard

Audio

MIDI

Aere Greenway

Aere Greenway

Demo, modified to be played with an ordinary typing-keyboard, and with only the FluidR3_GM soundfont. Composite voices are not required.

5

KeyMusician Keyboard Demo

Audio

MIDI

Aere Greenway

Aere Greenway

Make sure to set the key-signature (Transpose) button to 5-sharps. Once that's done, it's as easy to play as no flats or sharps.

2

Loch Lomond

Audio

MIDI


Aere Greenway

Traditional Scottish folk-song. “You'll take the high road, and I'll take the low road”

2

Morning Mood

Audio

MIDI

Edward Grieg

Aere Greenway

Theme from “Morning Mood”, in his “Per Gynt” Suit #1

1

Ode To Joy - Theme From Symphony #9

Audio

MIDI

Ludwig Van Beethoven

Aere Greenway

The rhythm on this one is easy, because it's almost all quarter-notes (one beat per note).

1

Oh Danny Boy

Audio

MIDI

Irish Traditional (Folk Song), Londonderry Air

Aere Greenway

Try it using the Oboe, the Bagpipe, and (with FluidR3_GM sound-font) Cello with the Base Octave spinner set to 1 (which lets you use the same letter-notes)

2

On-Trail

Audio

MIDI

Aere Greenway

Aere Greenway

Don't forget the instrument changes, which can be made by hitting the appropriate function key with the chord still playing.

5

Pensive Moments

Audio

MIDI

Aere Greenway

Aere Greenway

The squiggly vertical lines in front of certain notes means that the sequence of notes are to be played like a strummed-chord on a guitar.

With a gamers' keyboard (capable of acting on 5 simultaneous key-presses), this whole piece can be played entirely in the melody keys. You could also do it by plugging in an extra USB typing keyboard (one for each hand). Alternatively, you can play the melody, and the chords on the chords pad. The strummed chords feature (with a piano chords instrument) sounds almost like the original piece.

The recorded version was played with two USB typing keyboards.

3

Shenandoah

Audio

MIDI


Aere Greenway

Traditional U.S. folk-song

2

Swan of Tuonela, from Lemmenkainen Legend

Audio

MIDI

Jean Sibelius

Aere Greenway

On the dark waters of a river, bordering the land of the dead, swims a majestic swan, singing a mournful song.

3

Swedish Yule Song: Jomfruen Hun Gaar I Dansen

Audio

MIDI


Aere Greenway

Traditional Scandinavian song, often sung during the Christmas/Yule season.

3

The Great Gate Of Kiev, from Pictures At An Exhibition

Audio

MIDI

Modest Mussorgsky

Aere Greenway

This piece is great with the TimGM6mb.sf2 soundfont, using the trumpet sound. Alternatively, you could use the brass ensemble sound.

2

Theme from “Gymnopedes”

Audio

MIDI

Eric Satie

Aere Greenway

You've probably heard this one before. It was used in a popular rock album in the 60's.

2

Theme from “Nessun Dorma” of the opera “Turandot”

Audio

MIDI

Giocomo Puccinni

Aere Greenway

You've probably heard this opera aria before. The solo part is also good on the Cello instrument, when using the FluidR3_GM soundfont.

3

Theme from “Pavane For A Dead Princess”

Audio

MIDI

Maurice Ravel

Aere Greenway

The composer presented this theme with a French Horn, but I really love it with an Oboe.

If you want to play it with a French Horn, set the “Base Octave” spin-control to “1” (rather than the normal “2”), which will transpose it down an octave, even though you play the treble-clef music arranged for an Oboe.

4

Theme From “The New-World Symphony”

Audio

MIDI

Antonin Dvorak

Aere Greenway

This one is easy because of its slow tempo – especially if you've heard the tune before (which is possible). You can always hear it by clicking on its “Audio” link.

2

Trumpet Voluntary

Audio

MIDI

Aere Greenway

Aere Greenway

This piece is great with the TimGM6mb.sf2 soundfont, using the trumpet sound. It's not very good with the trumpet sound of the FluidR3_GM soundfont. You need a good trumpet sound for this piece.

Be sure to play the chord before the corresponding melody-note, so it will do the accidental (sharp or flat) for you, automatically.

5

Turning Toward Home

Audio

MIDI

Aere Greenway

Aere Greenway

This is a rock-sounding piece. Play the bass guitar part with the index finger of your left hand, and the other parts with its other fingers (especially the little-finger for long reaches).

The bass guitar and melody guitar parts are shown (in the music) in different staff-lines.

4

Washington Post March

Audio

MIDI

John Phillip Sousa

Aere Greenway

This short version of the famous march, allows a soloist on the KMK to sound like an entire marching band. It does this by changing instruments on-the-fly, and using the French Horns sound for the chords.

Use the indicated function keys for the Trumpet sound, and the Clarinet sound, because not every function-key can be reached while playing melody.

Pay close attention to the accidentals, because there are a lot of them, and they are essential!

A “NC” chord, means “No Chord”, which is to stop playing any chord at that point.

5

William Tell Overture

Audio

MIDI

Rossini

Aere Greenway

Some people will remember is this as the beginning to the music of the TV show “The Lone Ranger”

2